Friday, 30 April 2010

The Pitch Drop Experiment

The first Professor of Physics at the University of Queensland, Professor Thomas Parnell, began an experiment in 1927 to illustrate that everyday materials can exhibit quite surprising properties. The experiment demonstrates the fluidity and high viscosity of pitch, a derivative of tar once used for waterproofing boats. At room temperature pitch feels solid - even brittle - and can easily be shattered with a blow from a hammer. It's quite amazing then, to see that pitch at room temperature is actually fluid!

In 1927 Professor Parnell heated a sample of pitch and poured it into a glass funnel with a sealed stem. Three years were allowed for the pitch to settle, and in 1930 the sealed stem was cut. From that date on the pitch has slowly dripped out of the funnel - so slowly that now, 77 years later, the ninth drop is only just forming. Pitch drop experiment.

Archive Series by David Garcia Studio


The Archive Series has been exhibited at the Royal Danish Art Academy Fall Show 2005 with the support of the Danish Arts Agency, and at Traneudstilling in 2007.

Archive II is owned and on exhibition at the University of Roskilde Main Library.

The Archive Series are investigations on space and books. Its departure point is density and micro spaces, and a series of traditional relationships that humans have to books. Private collections have existed for centuries, but when this is added to nomadic behaviour, curious contradictions arise; this is the area studied by Archive II. How can an individual travel with it’s own library, given that books are so heavy? This is something we can all relate to when moving house. Archive II is a nomadic library, a transport system and an intimate space. Inspired by ancient travelling libraries from the Far East, which visited courts and cities, Archive II transforms this into a personal space, where walking and reading coexist as refuge and transport.



Archive I is a weight balance library,the readers chair is elevated in proportion to the amount of books in the shelves.
Archive II is a circular library for the nomad book collector, allowing the user to step inside, and walk away with half a ton of books.
Archive III is a censored book stand, the books close suddenly if anyone approaches the reading stand.

“As a child, I was introduced to an old friend of the family. I have never met anyone who has read so many books, could remember so many sources or quote so many authors as he could. Many years later, while studying at university, I would often call him for suggestions with bibliography regarding the most varied subjects. We would always meet in a café or a park, and my curiosity grew with time. What was his library like? I imagined him having endless rooms filled with books. Finally, one day, I convinced him to meet at his house, and to my deep disappointment, there were no books to be seen. My impatience took over and I asked him where he kept all his books? ”I only own the book I read at the moment” he answered. “When I finish them, I go for a walk, pick a stranger from the crowd, and give the book away.”


EVERY 30 SECONDS A BOOK IS PUBLISHED IN THE WORLD
THE AVERAGE PUBLICATION PRINTS 5000 COPIES
EVERY MINUTE 10 000 BOOKS ARE SENT TO PRINT


The average reader can read about 240 words per minute
A 300 page book normally takes 9 hours to read, non stop
I you read while you walk, you can read a book in about 43 kilometers
If you read and walk, watch out for traffic.
 LINK

UME magazine - David Chipperfield - Rowing Club





link to UME magazine. You can download the back issues for free. have a look. you might have to change the file ending to .pdf to look at them.

Copper House by Della Valle Bernheimer

from here at MUUUZ, thank you!

Copper House by Della Valle Bernheimer
In the valley of the Hudson, the New York architects Jared Della Valle and Andy Bernheimer have imagined this house weekend. Une construction revêtue d'un bardage de cuivre qui rouillera et se patinera avec le temps. A building clad in siding copper rust and will fade with time.
Photographer: Richard Barnes
For more information, visit the website Della Valle Bernheimer.
  • Copper House by Della Valle Bernheimer
  • Copper House by Della Valle Bernheimer
  • Copper House by Della Valle Bernheimer
  • Copper House by Della Valle Bernheimer

Lakeside Houseby NOW for Architecture and Urbanism

© Maija Luutonen
© Maija Luutonen
Architects: NOW for Architecture and Urbanism / Tuomas Toivonen
Location: Saimaa lake, Finland
Sketches: Nene Tsuboi
Photographs: Maija Luutonen

© Maija Luutonen
© Maija Luutonen
The site is in Saimaa, the Finnish lake district. A rocky west-facing slope, growing pine, juniper, moss, lichen and blueberries, descends to the vast lake. The house is designed as a place to meet and spend time together for a multigenerational family. The plan investigates how architecture can be actively used by the inhabitants to moderate between a collective experience and individual privacy.
floor plan
floor plan
© Maija Luutonen
© Maija Luutonen
All specific, functional spaces are compact, and gathered around a large living room that opens to the magnificent lake view. The sleeping alcoves and bedroom are intimate spaces that can be closed or opened to the common central space with simple revolving and sliding walls. The building’s interiors are white, leaving room for the changing light and colours of the day, seasons and landscape.

Thursday, 29 April 2010

Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider

Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider

Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider 
The German architectural firm Berschneider + Berschneider designed this small building that houses the toilets golf Lauterhofen. Une réalisation modeste et surprenante, faite de rondins de bois et d'acier. A modest achievement, and surprisingly, made of logs of wood and steel.
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider
  • Golf Lauterhofen by Berschneider

Archigram Archive is now Online

LINK

The Archigram Archival Project makes the work of the seminal architectural group Archigram available free online for public viewing and academic study. The project was run by EXP, an architectural research group at the University of Westminster. It was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and made possible by the members of Archigram and their heirs, who retain copyright of all images.

Eric Owen Moss Construction Manual, 1988-2008



via ARCHdaily

The Southern California Institute of Architecture is pleased to present Eric Owen Moss, director of SCI-Arc, in conversation with Frances Anderton, host of DnA: Design and Architecture on 89.9 KCRW and Los Angeles editor of Dwell Magazine. We interviewed Eric last April, a very interesting conversation. You can check his interview here. A book signing and reception will follow the discussion.
The book features 40 projects from Eric Owen Moss Architects, the Culver City-based firm Moss founded in 1973. The nearly 1,600-page manual includes first sketches, models, preliminary drawings, fabrications, and construction photos. Twenty-one of the featured projects have been built and several more are in the pipeline. Moss has taught, lectured and exhibited internationally; he has been the director of SCI-Arc since 2002.

Wednesday, 28 April 2010

Trufa by Anton García-Abril



A holiday home in Spain by Anton García-Abril of Ensamble Studio, cast in the earth and hollowed out by a cow.
Top and above photographs are copyright Roland Halbe.
Called Trufa (Truffle), the project involved pouring concrete over hay bales stacked and burried inside soil from the surroundings.
Once hardened, the resulting shape was exhumed and sliced open.
A cow (named Paulina) was then allowed to eat away the remaining hay bales to reveal the interior space over the course of a year.

Thanks to Dezeen, the original article can be found here:

Felix´s Machines



Check it out!
Felix’s Machines are music making sculptures. They were constructed in his bedroom and exist to facilitate music by translating rhythmic audio structures into a three-dimensional visual show.


link


Zagreb Pavilion by njiric+ arhitekti

© Matko Stankovic
© Matko Stankovic
Architects: njiric+ arhitekti doo
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
Photographs: Matko Stankovic & Domagoj Blazevic
© Matko Stankovic © Matko Stankovic © Matko Stankovic © Domagoj Blazevic

Criticism In-Progress

“It may seem, in fact, incomprehensible or even contradictory to denounce a lack of criticism in a situation that seems, on the other hand, caught in inextricable intellectual knots.”
Manfredo Tafuri (1980)
Hrvoje Njiric and Vedran Skopac’s pavilion proposal for this year’s Salon clearly seeks to critique contemporary material culture in Croatia. Being critical in a country without a clear target for criticism (who is really responsible?) and with little room for critical distance (the population of a medium sized city) is no easy task. To make matters worse, architecture is a difficult medium for social critique, requiring large investment as well as broad consensus even when the project simply seeks to solve a problem instead of articulating an argument. In the contemporary architectural discourse, skepticism as to the possibility of a critical architecture has grown into a theoretical position known as the Post Critical, at least a partial acceptance of the forces of capital and popular culture.
The discourse around the possibility of a critical architecture reached its peak around 1980, the year when Kenneth Frampton, in his work Modern Architecture: a Critical History, attempted to construct a historical framework for contemporary “critical” architecture. The book concluded with two possible critical positions: one the hand Mies’s beinahe nichts (almost nothing) a matter of fact approach that “the building task to the status of industrial design on an enormous scale” and on the other a new kind of vernacular, a “set of (architectural) relationships linking man to nature”, this concept eventually developing into Frampton’s theory of Critical Regionalism.
A Critical History and the subsequent proposals for a contemporary critical practice were based on an interpretation of the writings of Manfredo Tafuri, but Frampton glanced over one of Tafuri’s most interesting and least developed concepts the distinction between two forms of critical practice, the avant-garde and the experimental. For most historians and critics avant-garde practice was synonymous with notions of experimentation, but for Tafuri the two presented two distinct approaches, differing primarily in their practice and not in their product. For the purposes of defining a critical architecture, the avant-garde offers a method of direct critique, while the experimental only offers the possibility of framing a space of critique. The avant-garde’s critical message is possible because it is created in an autonomous space analogous to that of Fine Art production, outside of real time and politicized space. The experimental approach operates in real time and space, trading autonomy for agility.
© Matko Stankovic
© Matko Stankovic

Camera Obscura House






Designed by Franz Berzl and Gustav Deutsch

A Camera Obscura building was erected on the Greek island of Aegina as part of the European cultural project LIGHT I IMAGE I REALITY - The Aegina Academy 2003. It is a cylindrical building with 12 openings in hemispheric directions. The reflected light from its surroundings enters the cylinder through these openings and falls onto twelve screens hanging circularly off the ceiling. This way a panorama image of the surroundings is projected on to the screens, albeit flipped vertically as well as horizontally.

The building was erected on the foundations of an anti-aircraft base from WWII and is made up of steel and wood.

It is the first Camera Obscura building in Greece and the first one worldwide to create a panorama image.
link