Wednesday, 29 September 2010

Nigel Peake







Nigel Peake is an architect who draws beautiful illustrations of all kinds of things. His most recent book called Maps looks at ways of recording various cities he has travelled to and the importance of the map.






More of his work here:

http://www.secondstreet.co.uk/

and here:

http://nigel-peake.blogspot.com/

TED talks: Sir Ken Robinson: Bring on the revolution

TED talks, Sir Ken Robinson: Why schools kill creativity

Tuesday, 28 September 2010

Bartlett Year 1 Films 2010









Here is a selection of film by last years Year 1 students. Please have a look and look at the other ones on YOUTUBE as well (from the same account).

Sunday, 26 September 2010

Ghost forest to haunt Oxford for a year

ghost forest art installation 1
Some huge rainforest tree stumps from the Tropics will adorn the Natural History Museum and Pitt Rivers Museum, in Oxford, with an otherworldly connotation. Through the installation of these stumps, artist Angela Palmer urges the public to realize the plight of the world’s rainforests. The Ghost Forest is slated to be there from July 9, 2010 through July 31, 2011.

Friday, 24 September 2010

House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects

House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects

house of slope FujiwaraMuro 2 425x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects
click images to enlarge

Shintaro Fujiwara and Yoshio Muro of FujiwaraMura Architects recently completed House of Slope. If I lived here I would undoubtedly buy a chair with wheels and roll out the door every morning.
house of slope FujiwaraMuro 238x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects house of slope FujiwaraMuro 4 238x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects
The residential home is located in Osaka and was constructed on what is known as a flagpole site* (旗竿敷地).
house of slope FujiwaraMuro 3 425x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects
The home sits, like many homes in Japan, in a highly dense residential neighborhood. Working under these circumstances, the architects conceived the slope as having 2 purposes. First, it would create an ambiguous, undefined space that would be used not only as a means of transportation, but also as a gallery space, a child’s play area, or simply a place to sit down.
house of slope FujiwaraMuro 2 425x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects
Second, by wrapping the slope around the sides of the house, the resident will visually and consciously obtain a sprawling sense of space as they move from one room to the other.
house of slope FujiwaraMuro 5 425x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects
house of slope FujiwaraMuro 6 425x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects
house of slope FujiwaraMuro 7 238x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects house of slope FujiwaraMuro 9 238x318 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects
house of slope FujiwaraMuro 8 315x420 House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects

flagpole site House of Slope by FujiwaraMuro Architects*Flagpole site: a piece of land that is shaped like a flagpole (a), characterized by a narrow path leading to the main site, which is set back from the street. The flagpole site is a real-estate phenomenon that, is indigenous to Japan. It really began to spread after the end of WWII and can be attributed to homeowner psychology at the time. To own a home was to contribute to the rebuilding of Japan as a nation. It was considered one of the most patriotic things you could do.
Additionally, if you were going to own a home, the ideal shape was that of a samurai residence (武家屋敷), which happens to be defined by a perfectly square-shaped home that sits perfectly in the center of a larger square-shaped yard. However, in dense cities where land comes at a premium, the yard was forfeited. The only prerequisite for building a home was that it be square-shaped (size was a non-issue) as the perception that square = value quickly become embedded in the mindset.
To this day the product lineup of most homebuilding companies in Japan are based on the old samurai residence. This has resulted in neighborhoods being hashed up into small square-shaped land sites with a foot or so of dead space between neighboring houses. This is also the reason why trees are scarce in residential neighborhoods in Japan – squares don’t accommodate any sort of yard. [source]

Cone head visit British Pavillion by Heatherwick Studio



UK Pavilion at Shanghai Expo 2010 by Heatherwick Studio

Casa Vignolo. Benavídez by adamo-faiden arquitectos

from here on AFASIA thank you

Casa Vignolo. Benavídez
 

photos: gracias a adamo-faiden arquitectos

Thursday, 23 September 2010

Pierre Cardin's House

Pierre Cardin “was known for his avant-garde style and his space age designs. He prefers geometric shapes and motifs, often ignoring the female form. He advanced into unisex fashions, sometimes experimental, and not always practical. He introduced the “bubble dress” in 1954.” In short: he was on the edge – though perhaps not the cutting edge – of design for his time.retro modern house design
Bubble-shaped spaces and skylights define areas and light throughout the amorphous, organic and blob-like structure. Fun, fanciful and whimsical sum up the experience of the place quite well. Everything is about fluidity, curves – a kind of warp-drive vision of futuristic living that never quite came to pass, with an implicit belief that perhaps we would even grow our own abodes.
This amazing house is a trip both backward and forward in time – a vision of what designers from the past thought the future might look like. Strangest of all: it is a vintage futurism about as far from modern-day reality as one could have guessed … or was it?
retro future home

retro futuristic home interior
But was it so far-fetched after all? Certainly, no one could have predicted the rise of Postmodernist architects like Frank Gehry – and other who, like him, have been driven to design fantastically unpredictable forms. Without our ‘space-age’ 3D modeling capabilities and the computers up to handling their load-intensive tasks, none of their contemporary buildings would have been possible. And who knows, with the rise of nanotechnology maybe we will one down plant and grow organic houses from the ground up.

Wednesday, 22 September 2010

Walled Wall by Mikkel Schebye Johnsen


from here on MUUZ, thank you

Walled Wall par Mikkel Schebye Johnsen
En Norvège, à l’occasion du Bergen International Wood Festival, l’architecte danois Mikkel Schebye Johnsen a réalisé le « Walled Wall » avec Eirik Gulsrud Johnsen et Absalon Kirkeby. Cette structure de bois s’inspire de la Kowloon Walled City, l’ancienne citadelle de Kowloon à Hong Kong aujourd’hui détruite.
Walled Wall par Mikkel Schebye Johnsen
Walled Wall par Mikkel Schebye Johnsen
Walled Wall par Mikkel Schebye Johnsen
Walled Wall par Mikkel Schebye Johnsen
Walled Wall par Mikkel Schebye Johnsen
Pour en savoir plus, visitez le site de Mikkel Schebye Johnsen et celui du Bergen International Wood Festival.
Sources: Blog Bellostes et Mikkel Schebye Johnsen