Monday, 31 January 2011

Floating Cloud House Interior Filled with White Platforms by Shintaro Fujiwara


Like modern clouds, a series of cantilevered (and white-painted) few-feet-wide levels makes this home on a narrow site feel wide open despite the solid and windowless party walls along its length.

The lot itself is only 10 feet wide, but manages to feel spacious between various intelligent color choices, design strategies and ample glazing in front, back and via skylights. For all its dynamism and creativity, the restrictions on this structure actually provided much of the basis for the evolution of its design.

Using a split-level strategy, open-tread stairs with wire-frame metal (if any) railings take residents from one half-floor to the next.

White is used strategically to reflect light and make the spaces feel bright – except along one side, where the use of black reinforces the feeling that the central platforms are indeed half-floating rather than suspended between two structural sides.

While the black-and-white scheme, rectilinear components and contemporary fixtures make this whole home feel extremely modern, the wall-to-wall and floor-to-ceiling windows along the facade still frame a connection to the more traditional homes in the neighborhood.

Due to building code regulations and lack of space, Japanese architects like Shintaro Fujiwara are increasingly becoming the masters of small-space design on skinny sites.

Now, if only some of these thin-lot specialists would come to the United States they would likely be quite successful in places like Manhattan at least.

Sunday, 30 January 2011

TED TALKS: Gever Tulley teaches life lessons through tinkering

Spite houses





A spite house is a building constructed or modified to irritate neighbors or other parties with land stakes. Spite houses often serve as obstructions, blocking out light or access to neighboring buildings, or as flamboyant symbols of defiance. Because long-term occupation is at best a secondary consideration, spite houses frequently sport strange and impractical structures.

Stephanie Beck, Artist


from here on TERRITOIRE DES SENSES, thank you

Stephanie Beck, Aviary, Cut paper, found object, Thread, glue, 2010

Stephanie Beck, Aviary, Cut paper, found object, Thread, glue, 2010

Stephanie Beck, Section, Charcoal dust on paper, pins, 2008

Stephanie Beck, Section, Charcoal dust on paper, pins, 2008

Saturday, 29 January 2011

ANIKI BOBO film by Manoel de Oliveira, 1931






Aniki-Bóbó is a 1942 Portuguese film, directed by Manoel de Oliveira. It is his first feature-length film. Mostly children, from Oliveira's hometown, Porto, play in its story. 
WIKIPEDIA

Some of you might recognise some of the locations of the film. This was filmed 1931 in Porto. Please watch the other 5 parts as well. 
THANK YOU LUCY!

Le Corbusier, Villa Savoye in ruins

This is probably the most interesting shot of the Villa Savoye I’ve seen yet.
A quick rundown for those who never studied Modern Architecture 101.
There was once a guy called Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, but that name was a bit of a mouthful, so he called himself ‘Le Corbuser’ instead, which was a whole lot more awesome, especially in 1920 - though these days, and with those glasses, he’d probably be considered a pretentious hipster.
The guy was fairly ahead of his time and was one of the pioneers of Modern Architecture, which people also like to call ‘The International Style’, but don’t you call it that - it’s a rubbish name. The house above was built on five principles, which ‘Corb’ had been developing - basically, they included:
1: elevating the building off the ground, 2: A roof terrace for sweet parties, 3: ‘A free plan’ (which basically meant not having a plan restricted by those boring load-bearing walls), 4: Horizontal windows and 5: A freely designed facade. (here they all are in his words)
Of course, these days none of that sounds particularly ground breaking, but in 1926 it was out of control - essentially he was proposing that people start building their houses like factories. He even went so far to point out that ‘A house is a machine for living in’ which was certainly a fantastic sentiment, however despite this, once the roof garden on the Villa Savoy began leaking, the owners decided otherwise and wasted no time in setting out to sue Corbusier.
Thankfully for Corbusier (though not for most of Europe) World War II broke out and the matter was never settled. The house was subsequently occupied by the Germans, then later the Allies and then afterwards it fell into disrepair, at which point I assume this photo was taken.
At some point (like most early Modern Architecture) the house suddenly transformed from being a weird, ugly, architectural oddity to a seminal piece of Architectural History (brutalism is currently going through a similar process) and has since been fully restored and is now looking pretty good and enjoying life being mobbed by traveling architecture students, dragging along their generally disinterested friends who can’t understand how it’s supposed to be better than the Eiffel Tower.  
(The image above is from the book “On Weathering: The Life of Buildings in Time” which looks like an interesting read)
This is probably the most interesting shot of the Villa Savoye I’ve seen yet.
A quick rundown for those who never studied Modern Architecture 101.
There was once a guy called Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, but that name was a bit of a mouthful, so he called himself ‘Le Corbuser’ instead, which was a whole lot more awesome, especially in 1920 - though these days, and with those glasses, he’d probably be considered a pretentious hipster.
The guy was fairly ahead of his time and was one of the pioneers of Modern Architecture, which people also like to call ‘The International Style’, but don’t you call it that - it’s a rubbish name. The house above was built on five principles, which ‘Corb’ had been developing - basically, they included:
1: elevating the building off the ground, 2: A roof terrace for sweet parties, 3: ‘A free plan’ (which basically meant not having a plan restricted by those boring load-bearing walls), 4: Horizontal windows and 5: A freely designed facade. (here they all are in his words)
Of course, these days none of that sounds particularly ground breaking, but in 1926 it was out of control - essentially he was proposing that people start building their houses like factories. He even went so far to point out that ‘A house is a machine for living in’ which was certainly a fantastic sentiment, however despite this, once the roof garden on the Villa Savoy began leaking, the owners decided otherwise and wasted no time in setting out to sue Corbusier.
Thankfully for Corbusier (though not for most of Europe) World War II broke out and the matter was never settled. The house was subsequently occupied by the Germans, then later the Allies and then afterwards it fell into disrepair, at which point I assume this photo was taken.
At some point (like most early Modern Architecture) the house suddenly transformed from being a weird, ugly, architectural oddity to a seminal piece of Architectural History (brutalism is currently going through a similar process) and has since been fully restored and is now looking pretty good and enjoying life being mobbed by traveling architecture students, dragging along their generally disinterested friends who can’t understand how it’s supposed to be better than the Eiffel Tower.
(The image above is from the book “On Weathering: The Life of Buildings in Time” which looks like an interesting read)

from here, thank you!

Friday, 28 January 2011

House in Penafiel by Cláudio Vilarinho


Cláudio Vilarinho

 

Ideas before construction:
The idea: a white volume (28x10m) that rests on a continuous grass carpet.
The second idea: the house has 6 façades.
When in a highest stage we are descending the existing path, we see a volume that comes down and accompanies us; suddenly this volume leans up and projects itself to the valley.
The parking is located below the house (standing 10m in the air), the floor is made out of cement slabs that enables the circulation of a car while the grass grows.
The access to the main entrance of the house it's done through a "negative in the centre of the body" (a patio that contains a small tree).



Besides this opening in the roof, it has other four; we explore ways of air circulation, shades, contemplation; we want to enable different atmospheres.
The program is the conventional one for a house with four bedrooms.
In the elaboration of the project we had the need to orient the openings for the sights towards the horizon, on the other hand those same openings are predominantly oriented to West and South, leaving the East façade completely closed.
The intention of the matter:
1- a skin, a body;
2- the material, white, with a subtle texture:
a. on the walls of the façade,
b. on the exterior ceilings,
c. on the balconies floors,
d. on the patios floors,
e. and on the roof.
We wanted the sealing of the house's terrain to be permeable (wooden slats 6x6cm).
The construction system is made out of Light Steel Frame.



House 1 in Penafiel - Credits:

Project: House 1 in Penafiel
Location: Penafiel, Portugal
Date: 2005 (in construction), to complete May/Jun 2009
Client: Private
Architecture: Cláudio Vilarinho (except some details and materials – client responsibility)
Engineering: Apótema - Gabinete de Projectos Eléctricos, Rita & Gás, Lda. + Futureng, Lda. + Objecto, Engenharia e Construção Lda.
Builder: Objecto, Engenharia e Construção Lda. + Others

Practice Information

claudiovilarinho.com arquitectos e designers based in Porto, Portugal

Portuguese Architect - contact details


from here, thank you

Thursday, 27 January 2011

Chloë Østmo



Saw her at the ICA Bloomberg Young Contemporaries. Link here.

Distorted Home by the Austrian artist Erwin Wurm

from here on anARCHITECTURE, thank you!


Erwin Wurm - Narrow Mist.

The sculpture exhibition at the UCCA in Beijing by the Austrian artist Erwin Wurm is featuring the ‘Narrow house’, a piece of art, which might be a reflexion of the artist’s childhood house. A building shrunken only in one axis.
In his work, Wurm continuously digs behind everyday objects: fat cars, fat houses or Wurm’s amazing “one minute sculptures”. Read more about the UCCA exhibition at designboom. For another Wurm house project see "House Attack".

Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Tuesday, 25 January 2011

Katrin Sigurdardottir: Unbuilt Residences in Reykjavik, 1925-1930

periferiadomestica:


Katrin Sigurdardottir 
Unbuilt Residences in Reykjavik, 1925-1930
Brooklyn-based Icelandic artist Katrin Sigurdardottir considers the architectural history of her hometown in “Unbuilt Residencies in Reykjavik, 1920-1930” (2005), a blog that documents her fabrication and subsequent destruction of miniature houses modeled after unconsummated plans for residential development in Reykjavik
Texto vía rhizome.org

Imágenes Vía
periferiadomestica:
Katrin Sigurdardottir
Unbuilt Residences in Reykjavik, 1925-1930
Brooklyn-based Icelandic artist Katrin Sigurdardottir considers the architectural history of her hometown in “Unbuilt Residencies in Reykjavik, 1920-1930” (2005), a blog that documents her fabrication and subsequent destruction of miniature houses modeled after unconsummated plans for residential development in Reykjavik
Texto vía rhizome.org
Imágenes Vía
Cite Arrow reblogged from periferiadomestica

Monday, 24 January 2011

BOOK: The Thinking Hand by Juhanni Pallasmaa


Review

"The Thinking Hand is a superb piece of writing. A primer not just for architecture, but for life." (Blueprint, July 2009) "...beautifully illustrated sequence of essays...It is philosophical, emotional and, unusually for architectural theory, as clear as a building made of glass." (The Guardian, August 1st 2009)

Product Description

In this book Pallasmaa progresses his case for a multi–sensory approach to architecture, espoused in The Eyes of the Skin, by taking a wider view of the role of embodiment in human existential reactions, experiences and expressions as well as the processes of making and thinking. ‘The Thinking Hand’ is a metaphor for the characteristic independence and autonomous activity of all our senses as they constantly scan the physical world. Many of our most crucial skills are internalised as automatic reactions that we are not consciously aware of. Even in the case of learning skills, the sequence of movements in a task is internalised and embodied rather than understood and remembered intellectually. Prevailing educational philosophies continue to emphasise conceptual, intellectual and verbal knowledge over this tacit and non–conceptual wisdom of our embodied processes, which is so essential to our experience and understanding of the physical and the built. 


Juhani lectured last year at the Bartlett, here the lecture link:
Juhani Pallasmaa
Architect
Juhani Uolevi Pallasmaa is a Finnish architect and former professor of Architecture at the Helsinki University of Technology and a former Director of the Museum of Finnish Architecture (1978-1983). He runs his own architect's office - Arkkitehtitoimisto Juhani Pallasmaa KY - in Helsinki. He is also Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor at Washington University in St. Louis,U.S..
His exhibitions of Finnish architecture, planning and visual arts have been displayed in more than thirty countries and he has written numerous articles on cultural philosophy, environmental psychology and theories of architecture and the arts.
A selection of essays written by Pallasmaa, from the early years to more recent ones, has been translated into English and collated together in the book "Encounters - Architectural Essays" (Helsinki, 2005), edited by Peter MacKeith. The book was shortlisted for the RIBA 2005 International Book Award.
In 2006 Pallasmaa turned 70, and the occasion was marked by the publication of the book Archipelago.
Pallasmaa is a member of the Finnish Association of Architects, and an honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

Sunday, 23 January 2011

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects at the Venice Biennale




post from here on ARCHDAILY thank you

Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects shared with us their exhibition at the , showing two buildings with a similar size are located in two different contexts. A light grey concrete piece rests in the middle of a natural scene. A cooper oxide green concrete prism stands in the middle of a suburban setting. Two opposite conditions which are presented by a disproportionate relationship between figure and background. The proposed constructions are reproduced as small sculptural models. The landscape is recorded in a huge panoramic backlight photograph. The objects, autonomous from their location, seem insignificant in front of the monumental effort of trying to capture most of the details and complexities of the surroundings.

diagram
In Architecture there is an eternal tension between context and object. Since a building is inevitably placed in a particular and unrepeatable location, it establishes a limited set of specific relationships with it. Considering this physical inevitability, to willingly base the integrity of a building in those common places (such as orientation, views, access or topography) is in itself a common place, or at least the minimum that an architect should aspire to do. To explain a building as an answer to a place is to explain the place, not the building. It is no more than a tautological exercise, instrumentally required for political or commercial purposes. However, a building, in its inner formal structure, could also be understood as an independent logical grammar. In its unitary conclusiveness, an architectural object could be separated from its location, from its anecdotal dramas. An isolated building is a singular entity. It is a piece, a device that resists, with more or less integrity, the problems (social, cultural, economical or technical) of the context that supports it.
Today, considering the widespread scarcity of resources, it appears problematic to trace a project as an autonomous figure. There is no possible canon, no fixed measure, when dealing with an unstable and informal environment. That context is anywhere. Therefore, a project is meant to be a flexible machine. Its efficiency is determined by its accidents. In this lack of autonomy, architectural practice is faced as a mere fitness activity, a continuous negotiation, an unpredictable contest to articulate a new program with an existing place. But that is half of the idea, half of the promises of and architectural statement. The other half is what could be called the anti-fitness property of a building. This is the objectual aura of the piece; the capacity of an object of replying, of declining the expected associations, up to the extent of producing a sort of uncomfortable situation in a given moment. It is an irony, as Borges said, to select as a personal option what is imposed as an inevitable condition.

Exhibited Work

Architects (Mauricio Pezo, Sofia von Ellrichshausen)
Detached, 2 backlight photographs (600x50x300cm) and 2 concrete scale models (30x30x40cm), 2010.

How Ink Is Made

Saturday, 22 January 2011

Compact Children’s Room by Naoto Mitsumoto

nr17.jpg
nr13.jpg
NR1977 is a 770 square feet apartment for a couple and their four children in Tokyo, it’s the project of architecture studio, Naoto Mitsumoto.
from WOOHOME thank you
nr12.jpg
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nr16.jpg
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