Wednesday, 28 September 2011

The Architecture of Star Wars

The Architecture of Star Wars
Well, hopefully, with age you’ve adopted more serious concerns and sought out life’s greater mysteries and meanings (though we’re not sure that’s entirely true for all of you). But for nostalgia’s sake, you’ll want to get your hands on Star Wars: the Blueprints, a book so big it needed its own trailer (below). The new tome contains the most comprehensive compilation of working drawings and architectural plans that served as the basis for the ships, space ports, planets, buildings and infrastructure against which the Star Wars films played out. With over 500 photographs and illustrations, the book lays out in detail everything from the workings of Tatooine’s quirky farming machinery or the robotic constitution of R2-D2. Here’s to hoping you’ll be able to build your own droid!
The book, which weight 35 pounds and cost $500, is limited to 5,000 prints, so you’ll have to act fast to secure your own copy. To find out more about the book, click here
from here on ARCHITIZER thank you!
'Well, hopefully, with age you’ve adopted more serious concerns and sought out life’s greater mysteries and meanings. But for nostalgia’s sake, you’ll want to get your hands on Star Wars: the Blueprints, a book so big it needed its own trailer.
The book, which weight 35 pounds and cost $500, is limited to 5,000 prints, so you’ll have to act fast to secure your own copy.' 

To find out more about the book, click here

Sunday, 25 September 2011

Friday, 23 September 2011

William Notman & Son: Little James Street, Montréal

William Notman & Son: Little James Street, Montréal | Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA)
During the night of 22 January 1888, a terrible fire destroyed an  imposing stone building on Little St. James Street, east of Place  d’Armes in Montréal. The five-storey building with a façade of 165 feet  was home to different companies, including several American business  firms. The New York Times hastened to report the event, characterising  the drama as “one of the worst fires that had visited Montréal for many  years.”
According to the article, the fire began shortly after midnight on  the second floor of the building; an extremely cold night and westerly  winds soon caused the water hoses to freeze, while the “firemen were  quickly transformed into walking blocks of ice.” Despite the efforts of  the fire brigade, the flames spread rapidly through the stairwells and  explosions were heard repeatedly. The equipment inadequate, the cold  intense, ”the men and horses exhausted,” the only solution was to let  the fire to die out of its own accord. In the early hours of the  morning, it was reported “the block is to-day covered by a solid sheet  of ice.”
The photograph by Notman & Son was no doubt taken during the  morning of 22 January 1888. The photographer unites the key elements of  the event and succeeds, through a discerning choice of perspective,  light and framing, in capturing the drama  and conveying the spectacular  effect and striking transformation of the building encased in ice.
In addition to this image, the CCA Collection holds, among others, a series of stereographs and a rare  illustrated publication of chromophotographs based on views by William  Notman of the construction of the Victoria Bridge in Montréal  (1858-1860).
William Notman & Son: Little James Street, Montréal | Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA)
During the night of 22 January 1888, a terrible fire destroyed an imposing stone building on Little St. James Street, east of Place d’Armes in Montréal. The five-storey building with a façade of 165 feet was home to different companies, including several American business firms. The New York Times hastened to report the event, characterising the drama as “one of the worst fires that had visited Montréal for many years.”
According to the article, the fire began shortly after midnight on the second floor of the building; an extremely cold night and westerly winds soon caused the water hoses to freeze, while the “firemen were quickly transformed into walking blocks of ice.” Despite the efforts of the fire brigade, the flames spread rapidly through the stairwells and explosions were heard repeatedly. The equipment inadequate, the cold intense, ”the men and horses exhausted,” the only solution was to let the fire to die out of its own accord. In the early hours of the morning, it was reported “the block is to-day covered by a solid sheet of ice.”
The photograph by Notman & Son was no doubt taken during the morning of 22 January 1888. The photographer unites the key elements of the event and succeeds, through a discerning choice of perspective, light and framing, in capturing the drama and conveying the spectacular effect and striking transformation of the building encased in ice.
In addition to this image, the CCA Collection holds, among others, a series of stereographs and a rare illustrated publication of chromophotographs based on views by William Notman of the construction of the Victoria Bridge in Montréal (1858-1860).

Friday, 16 September 2011

Perspectives by John Pawson at St Paul's Cathedral

Perspectives by John Pawson at St Paul's Cathedral


Perspectives by John Pawson at St Paul's Cathedral


The British architect John Pawson has installed the largest lens ever made by crystal brand Swarovski in the southwest tower of St Paul’s Cathedral.

Dazed and Confused: Embroidery Fashion Spread


Via acidolatte
from  Dazed and Confused thank you!.

Wednesday, 14 September 2011

London Open House this weekend


Open House London 17 & 18 September 2011

It is a unique opportunity to get out and under the skin of London’s amazing architecture with over 700 buildings of all kinds opening their doors, plus neighbourhood walks, cycle tours, architects’ talks and debates taking place – all for free.

For full details check the London Open House website.

Image: Crossness Engines House, Bexley

Standard House by KWK Promes

by

more on DAILYDOSE, thank you! 

drawing 03

Sunday, 11 September 2011

R-HOUSE by Della Valle Bernheimer and Architecture Research Office

Photo © Richard Barnes from here on metalocus.es thank you! 
This prototype residence in Syracuse, New York, is called “R-House.” The design was a competition-winner as part of an initiative to revitalize the blighted Syracuse neighborhood of Westside. R-House presents an affordable, innovative paradigm: minimal- to- net-zero energy consumption embodied in architecture that is meant to nurture the spirit and engage the community as much as it is meant to perform in terms of cost and sustainable design.
Site.
R-House was created in full collaboration with Architecture Research Office. The prototype residence that these two design firms envisioned for Syracuse, New York, is called “R-House”, a winner of Syracuse University’s “From the Ground Up” competition, held in conjunction with the Syracuse Center of Excellence and Home Headquarters as part of their initiative to revitalize the Near Westside neighborhood of Syracuse. R-House won an Award of Merit from the AIA NY Chapter, 2010.

Saturday, 10 September 2011

Fabric Facade Studio by CC-Studio, Studio TX & Rob Veening

Fabric Facade Studio Apartment by cc-studio, studio TX and Rob Veening
Strips of perforated fabric are tacked onto the facades of this house near Amsterdam by Dutch architects CC-Studio and Studio TX.
Fabric Facade by cc-studio, studiotx and Rob Veening
The design for Fabric Facade Studio Apartment was developed in collaboration with client and artist Rob Veening.
Fabric Facade by cc-studio, studiotx and Rob Veening
from here on DEZEEN thank you!

Wednesday, 7 September 2011

Jun Igarashi Architects: House O


from here on DESIGNBOOM thank you!
jun igarishi architects
 
image © iwan baan






section


floor plan
(1) entrance
(2) storage
(3) living room
(4) washroom
(5) toilet
(6) dining room
(7) kitchen
(8) japanese style room
(9) guest room
(10) storage room
(11) washroom
(12) utility
(13) bathroom
(14) bedroom
(15) closet
(16) pit

Saturday, 3 September 2011

You are what you eat....


Via Fubiz

With the series ‘In Your Fridge’, photographer Stephanie de Rouge let’s us have a peak into peoples fridges. Just the kind of thing my curious nature loves.
Stephanie de Rouge is a fine art and documentary photographer based in New York City.

Friday, 2 September 2011